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Canada Post – Show Me the Real Numbers

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Background: I had posted this link on Facebook. My thoughts right or wrong on the removal of urban address delivery (note I do not say house delivery) was in response to a very uninsightful and hurtful comment and also I might add indignantly urban aimed comment from Government House leader Peter Van Loanwho stated:

“I am reminded of a time when the City of Toronto was going through some rationalization and trying to figure out how to deliver services,” he said. “The good people of Rosedale did not like the idea [that] no longer would the garbage man come up to the side of the house to take the garbage, it was going to have to be like it was for everybody else in the country, they would have to get it at the end of the driveway.”

This MP has a rural district so is imune from voter backlash. I did find that elitist attitude towards sanitation collectors being compared to the removal of mail service for more than 12 Million people in our nation rather uninspiring. And as mentiond hurtful and segregationsit. Then again the power of the MPs for the ruling party is said to be in rural areas.

Yes, but that also includes towns and they will not stand for that. The response came from a post I made. I only posted that, not a preview comment – as my mobile app for the Chronicle Herald did not allow that. Here are the responses (I will not name the people as I do not nor have not asked permission:

  • Vancouver Urban: “Agreed!! I’m reminded of the early 1970’s, when Farmers Dairy stopped home delivery of milk in Nova Scotia. The world didn’t come to an end then and it won’t now.”
  • Nova Scotia Rural: “Yup. That’s me.”
  • Family in Rural NS: “No Sympathy.

The following is what I started to say on Facebook, but I thought I might reach out to a larger audience who might weigh in here on the blog. You can easily do so and I will approve legitimate posts (ie not spam).

My thoughts on the removal of urban address delivery in Canada:

Removal of home delivery will not create the end of the world. However  there are more folks in urban centers who need the daily delivery. Or are they? Most might live in apt. buildings which will still be serviced.

I cannot see putting a big box outside each highrise when there are boxes and places inside. Hard to say. My personal opinion is that Canada Post should not be turning a profit as DND or a hospital should not. It is part of the social fabric of this nation that again is being torn apart. Yes the urban centers are the minority of the ADDRESSES that they deliver to. But one urban address may hold 100’s of families.

That is how how I believe that theyb are trying to make they make the numbers work.

What is the definition? The OFFICIAL definition of an urban area by our very own federal government is as follows:

An urban area is defined as an area with a population of at least 1,000 and with no fewer than 400 persons per square kilometre.

The proportion of Canadians who live in urban areas has increased steadily since Confederation. In 2011, more than 27 million Canadians (81%) lived in urban areas, a reversal from over a century ago. The three largest urban areas in Canada – Toronto, Vancouver, and Montréal – made up just over one third (35%) of Canada’s entire population, in 2011.

 Note: For 1981 to 2011, "urban population" refers to persons living within centres with a population of 1,000 or more and within areas with at least 400 persons per square kilometre. Before 1981, "urban population" refers to populations within centres of 1,000 people or more. Source: For 1871 to 2001, Statistics Canada. Population urban and rural, by province and territory (Canada). Available from: Summary Tables (accessed October 19, 2006); For 2006 and 2011, Population and Dwelling Count Highlight Tables, 2011 Census. Available from: 2011 Census (accessed March 12, 2012).

Note: For 1981 to 2011, “urban population” refers to persons living within centres with a population of 1,000 or more and within areas with at least 400 persons per square kilometre. Before 1981, “urban population” refers to populations within centres of 1,000 people or more.
Source: For 1871 to 2001, Statistics Canada. Population urban and rural, by province and territory (Canada). Available from: Summary Tables (accessed October 19, 2006); For 2006 and 2011, Population and Dwelling Count Highlight Tables, 2011 Census. Available from: 2011 Census (accessed March 12, 2012).

 

So in the end it is about releasing this after Parliament is finished. I would look to my MP Megan Leslie to maybe weigh in on this. All I know is that I can yes walk down to a box and get my mail. Hell I might now get my mail and others might get theirs. Based on others mail that I get (which I send back to the system with a big note on the outside of how postal delivery is inadequate at best) I estimate 10% of my mail is delivered to another address. I miss important mail from clients and family and also get important mail for others. Not to mention VISA applications. The postal delivery service is broken. It just does not work.

I offer no solutions. I also rebuff those that say one cannot gripe without a solution. I can always voice my opionion and I vote. So there be that. Solutions? Lets leave that to others.

Or you can leave it to me if you want to pay me enough.

Remember. Numbers can be construed to say anything. Just not those that come from metrics from your digital advertising, paid search, social media reach or website analytics. Otherwise known as what?

Yep digital marketing. And I guess we are kicking either the ass out of Canada Post, or have them so confused, they are taking a wrong way out – depend on the untrustworthy numbers.

Again please voice your pinion or share. Thanks.

3 Responses to “Canada Post – Show Me the Real Numbers”

  1. I’m reminded of the early 1970’s, when Farmers Dairy stopped home delivery of milk in Nova Scotia. The world didn’t come to an end then and it won’t now.

    A subsidy for Canada Post would be very harmful to the progress of many industries. For example, it would encourage companies to continue to use paper based systems, rather than the more efficient and environmentally beneficial electronic systems – e.g. online billing.

    I have encountered a lot of people who are anxious about the loss of jobs. I understand their angst, but it is unwarranted. History has shown that the market will reconfigure and the unused labour will be put to more productive use. You may not be immediately able to imagine these new uses, because this is a process that will require thousands of entrepreneurs many trials to discover. It is a process that has gone on for at least 200 years.

    I challenge anyone to read the old census reports and other historical records (as I have done). 100 years ago almost NONE of the jobs that were common in society are still done today.

    As I think back to my youth, I can still remember legions of secretaries with manual typewriters, receptionists who answered phones and gas station attendants who pumped gas. It was the law in Nova Scotia that every gas station had to have a mechanic on duty, but cars don’t break down as much any more. Surely we would not want cars to be less reliable so there would be more jobs!

    The suburbs have slowed in their growth and in many places the tide has reversed. Many cities have active programs to prevent suburban sprawl and increase density in their core. Around the world the trend is toward urban development. In the major cities in Canada these trends are already very evident. Toronto, Montreal, Vancouver, Calgary and Surrey are all developing their city centers.

    The postman will soon be a quaint idea from another time. He/she will join history’s long list of outdated professions.

    I certainly would not be in favour of political intervention in this matter. Canada Post and government policy did not create the circumstances that exist today. Any politician who pretends he or she can reverse the tide of history is either a fool or is trying to appeal to our natural angst about the future.

    I don’t know if we’ll all be flying around in jet packs or living on other planets, but I know one thing with near certainty – the job you’re doing today will not exist in 50 to 100 years, perhaps much sooner.

  2. textureweb says:

    Thanks so much for your thoughts CW. But what bout those urban numbers. We still do not not know if an apt bldg is treated as one address, nor do we know why one government department says 81% live in an urban setting, whilst Canada Post says only 33% do. Reminds me like I said in my post – you can make numbers say what you want. You just have to understand how to massage numbers.

    Not saying you are wrong, just saying we have yet to find the answer to the question which is raised by the numbers which Canada Post is using for justification.

    Thar be the truth. Like any of us will ever find that out.

  3. The balance sheet has the only numbers that matter. Canada Post is losing $100 Million per month and labour is their #1 cost.

    If I were an opposition politician, I wouldn’t touch this issue with a barge pole.